Category Archives: Teaching

7-9 Year-old Dalcroze, 4/4/17

This week’s activities:

We first reviewed the notation and language for some basic rhythms for compound (ternary) meter: dotted quarters, 3 eighth notes, quarter-eighth. I put the symbols on the board, and asked one student to stand in front of the one he/she wanted to hear and see moved. After this quick reaction game, I gestured a pattern. In our rhythm language, it was, “Running and skip and beat beat.” I asked them to speak it in as many different ways as they could (using the same words). It took some time but we eventually got a variety of dynamics and tempos. I then asked them to move freely to the music, but stop and show the pattern if as soon as they heard it. After this, we practiced simply moving the pattern. The starts with three running steps, which lead to a single skip, followed by two slow steps. It was challenging for them to get off the ground and immediately stop. There were varying degrees of success, but as a group we managed to get a gestalt of the pattern.

They wanted to be seen moving it one at a time, so I asked them to design the space. They lined up and each moved the rhythm twice across the diagonal of the room. I decided to spend some time making what we call a ‘plastique’ out of the rhythm. In this case, this means that we choreograph how to move, who is moving when, the shape and organization of movement in the room. I did a fair amount of prompting by giving them a series of choices (e.g. “Should we move it twice or once? “Should partners move at the same time, or one after the other?”). In this way I helped them to make the many small decisions necessary to create organized movement. We tried it several times and I accompanied them on the piano.

We ended with a quick experience/game with three rubber spots, which I placed on the ground and associated 1, 3 and 5 of the major scale with. First I moved and sang myself. Then I moved and asked them to sing. Finally, I sang while they moved. We improvised short phrases for a while, and then said goodbye. I will return to this game in the future.

 

 

7-9 year-old Dalcroze: 3/28/17

Here’s what we did:

  • Tempo and dynamics Follow ( 2 dotted quarters, 3 eighths, 1 dotted quarter)
    • In this classic Dalcroze exercise, the class moves a pattern through a variety of tempo and dynamics changes. The three eighths required us to develop some technique, as the students found it difficult to run for three and stop suddenly.
  • Drums around the room; move freely until you hear the pattern, then stop and play it on the nearest drum.
    • This required some sharp listening and more movement technique. I was able to test their abilities to discern between variations of the pattern a couple of times. They seemed to enjoy this game.
  • Improvisation: 2 groups; one plays a 3 bars of a pattern, alternating with a one bar soloist by someone from the other group.
    • This was an arrangement that I came up with, in hopes that they would suggest alternatives after a few times through. We came up with a few interesting variations.
  • Free improvisation
    • This was the most interesting part of the class for me. As students were suggesting ways to change the above improvisation, they ran into inevitable disagreements. I began to suggest that music could accommodate everyone’s wishes if they decided that was ok. We tried this successfully within a strict structure as above, and then I suggested that we all try to play together without discussing anything first. Our intention would be to play what we wanted while listening to what other’s played. There was, maybe predictably, a lot of loud playing, and I did wish for more attentiveness to others as they were doing it. However, all seemed very pleased with the results, and someone surprised that this was even possible. There is nothing particularly Dalcrozian about this concept (it comes more from the free jazz tradition), but it certainly does not go against the grain of our work. Perhaps we will be able to build on this idea in future classes.

 

7-9 year-old Dalcroze: 3/21/17

What can you do with 4 spots?

The question is quite open, but the kids took it in the spirit intended (uses were restricted to ways to arrange and move through them). Here are some of the ways they discovered, and questions they explored:

  • arrange in square, step only on the spots
  • what’s the difference between a square and a diamond in this case? (answer was inconclusive, but seemed to have to do with visual perspective)
  • take one step in between each spot
  • place them far a part
  • place them close together

I played a pattern (quarter quarter half) and asked them to arrange the spots any way they liked, and to move through them to show this pattern.

There were two solutions. In one the kids stopped on the spot for the long note, in the other they kept moving, arriving at the spot during the second beat of the longest note. The spot represented a rest in one version, and the end of the pattern in the other. Both true, and highlighting different perspectives. I accompanied both versions, and one student felt certain that I was changing the way I played on the second version. I wasn’t, but her feeling changed by changing her movement. A very Dalcrozian experience!

Chalk Talk Exploration

They asked to draw on the chalk board. Ok: one student drew, and I followed their movement on the piano. After everybody had a turn, we switched: I played and they drew to match. This was an introduction to a dictation technique that we will return to later.

Bessie Smith and Louis Armstrong: St Louis Blues

We ended by listening for the call and response of trumpet and voice in a classic recording of the blues we have been playing and singing for the past few weeks. Here’s the link if you’d like to hear it.

 

 

7-9 Year-old Dalcroze: 3/6/17

This was another very unusual class. The story from the previous week was very strong in their minds, and they desperately wanted to continue it. That kind of intense student engagement is very hard for me to resist, so I relented, not having the least idea about where it would turn out. To further complicate matters, one student who was absent last week was present this week, so he had to be brought up to speed. Instead of my usual list of activities, here is a straight narrative of the day:

We began with a quick reaction game: if you hear music, move with the feet; no music move with the hands. I long even phrases at first (8 beats of music, 8 beats of silence) and gradually worked it down to shorter patterns. My goal was to introduce some basic rhythm patterns in 4 that contain 1 beat rest. They were moderately successful at this, so I went to the board and notated them to see if they could distinguish between them. They are not quite ready for this, but they can reproduce them if I point in time to the rhythms.

They suffered through all of this rather pedestrian teaching so they could get to what they really wanted to do: continue the story. We ended up spending most of our time trying to remember everything: which rhythms went with which characters; what the rhythms were, who was playing what.

Each group was supposed to play as the others moved, and here I probably pushed a little too hard to get them to act like a sensitive orchestra. Give anybody an instrument and the first thing they want to do is explore it: make sound, see what it does, try this, try that… The last thing a kid wants to do is hold it silently and wait for something to start. I can get kids there, but I need to allow them time to discover first, and I did do that.

All in all, our creative rhythms did not fall into place this time. But artistic creation is certainly like that. If nothing else they got to experience that knowing that we could try again another day.

 

Michael

7-9 year-old Dalcroze: 2/28/17

This was an unusual class in many ways. The girls’ love for dramatic story telling prompted almost an entire class devoted to the development, rehearsal and enactment of one story. The class loosely followed some goals I had already set up, which was to work with 3 different rhythm patterns that are found in the slow movement of Mahler’s 1st Symphony. This movement is a basically a minor reworking of the tune Frere Jacques. But here is roughly the sequence of events:

  • I asked the girls to create characters for each of the 3 rhythm patterns I had written on the board, and which I played on the drum. They came up with a king, a queen and a kangaroo.
  • I let them choose whichever character they wanted to be. There were many kangaroos, a few queens and no kings – so I took on that role.
  • We explored how each group would move according to their specific rhythm pattern.
  • By asking them a series of questions, they created the following scenario: there is a king who likes turning people into statues, and one day he froze the entire kingdom. When the queen saw this she tried to save the statues, but was unsuccessful. A bunch of kangaroos came along and worked their magic spells to release the people. The queen was delighted.
  • Each group had percussion instruments. The kangaroos were to play for each other, and all played for me. We practiced this.
  • We enacted the story, attempting to talk as little as possible. This was easier the second time.
  • I told them that after the statues were released, the king was sorry he had done that. The entire kingdom came together and moved each other’s rhythms in different patterns. At this point I played the Mahler and asked them to listen for each rhythm and move freely however they liked. Some chose to move as a character, others choose to pretend to play instruments. After one time through, we talked about what they heard. We played it one more time, and pointed out the various rhythms we heard as it went along.

 

By this point, the time was almost up. We gathered for a quick round or two of the St. Louis Blues, and had to say goodbye. This was a class I might be able to repeat with a different group, but only one as imaginative and interested in story as this one.

Dalcroze: 7-9-Year-olds, 2/14/17

Here’s what we did:

  • Statue tag
    • All students make a statue. One moves as long as she likes. When she stops, she makes the shape of one of the statues. That statue is free to move.
      • This game is more fun when whoever is making someone else’s shape does not make their shape directly in front of the other person. This forces both the mover to be very clear, and the entire to class to watch the mover. Improvised music follows the mover.
    • Move to the music; when you hear one measure of eighth notes, stop for one measure.
      • This is a quick reaction calling for an inhibition. It’s challenging because the listener has to pay attention to the melody while moving (always a challenge for this age), and rest for exactly 4 beats. Most everyone needed verbal cues and pretty clear signals from the piano to achieve this. We will continue to work to strengthen the internal rhythmic feeling necessary to do this well.
    • What can you do with one stick and a special friend (who also has one stick).
      • A chance to exercise the imagination and work with a partner. Many creative responses.
    • Partner A holds out stick for 8 beats; B plays 8 beats on A’s stick. A moves stick each phrase. Switch.
      • After accompanying them on piano for a while, I began to play “Ah, Poor Bird” from last week. As they recognized it they began to tap it.
    • Spin off
      • The partners move to the music separately. When they hear the first 4 bars of the song, they must find their partner in time to tap the last 4 bars.
        • As the game went along I disguised the music more and more, challenging them to listen closely for the quarter-quarter-half rhythm of the opening. Some were successful, others needed some verbal cues.
      • Explore notation of song.
        • Now that they were thoroughly familiar with the rhythm of the song, it was time to see it translated into notation. As they stretched out on the floor, I asked them to show quarter notes in their legs, half notes in their arms (in retrospect I wish I would have switched these two) and eighth notes in the air with arms. I played through the various durations for a while, and then slipped into the song one last time. Some were able to translate it into their body, but that was hard for others. I sat them up and we put the notation on the board for all to see.
      • Blues
        • We ended by playing call and response phrases (with percussion) over the blues. I used St Louis Blues, a song I hope to come back to over the next few weeks.

Dalcroze: 7-9-Year-olds, 2/7/14

Back to my own observations… enjoy!


 

  • Statue tag
    • All students make a statue. One moves as long as she likes. When she stops, she makes the shape of one of the statues. That statue is free to move.
      • This game is more fun when whoever is making someone else’s shape does not make their shape directly in front of the other person. This forces both the mover to be very clear, and the entire to class to watch the mover. Improvised music follows the mover.
    • Move to the music; when you hear one measure of eighth notes, stop for one measure.
      • This is a quick reaction calling for an inhibition. It’s challenging because the listener has to pay attention to the melody while moving (always a challenge for this age), and rest for exactly 4 beats. Most everyone needed verbal cues and pretty clear signals from the piano to achieve this. We will continue to work to strengthen the internal rhythmic feeling necessary to do this well.
    • What can you do with one stick and a special friend (who also has one stick).
      • A chance to exercise the imagination and work with a partner. Many creative responses.
    • Partner A holds out stick for 8 beats; B plays 8 beats on A’s stick. A moves stick each phrase. Switch.
      • After accompanying them on piano for a while, I began to play “Ah, Poor Bird” from last week. As they recognized it they began to tap it.
    • Spin off
      • The partners move to the music separately. When they hear the first 4 bars of the song, they must find their partner in time to tap the last 4 bars.
        • As the game went along I disguised the music more and more, challenging them to listen closely for the quarter-quarter-half rhythm of the opening. Some were successful, others needed some verbal cues.
      • Explore notation of song.
        • Now that they were thoroughly familiar with the rhythm of the song, it was time to see it translated into notation. As they stretched out on the floor, I asked them to show quarter notes in their legs, half notes in their arms (in retrospect I wish I would have switched these two) and eighth notes in the air with arms. I played through the various durations for a while, and then slipped into the song one last time. Some were able to translate it into their body, but that was hard for others. I sat them up and we put the notation on the board for all to see.
      • Blues
        • We ended by playing call and response phrases (with percussion) over the blues. I used St Louis Blues, a song I hope to come back to over the next few weeks.

7-9 Year-old Dalcroze: 1/31/17

This week, a guest poster: Laca Tines. She is a student in our methods class (you may have seen her observing), and a wonderful early childhood music teacher herself. As part of our class, she was asked to write an observation report. I thought hers was keenly observed, and asked for her permission to post it. It is always interesting to see our work through other’s eyes. Thanks, Laca!

Laca Tines
Dalcroze Observation/1-31-17 Instructor: Michael Joviala 7-9 year-olds

ACTIVITY: Story/Fairies and Elves, Phase 1: individual movement
T placed scarves on the floor around the room. Each student had a turn to move around the room in any way she chose and then navigate the scarves by jumping over them, walking around them, etc.
T accompanied each child’s movement on piano.
Response: Most children chose to skip around the room and then jump over each scarf. (One student did choose to walk for a bit before skipping–an interesting choice which she seemed to make quite deliberately.) Students were very engaged and eager to see what was next. Purpose: locomotor exploration/improvisation, navigatng space/energy

ACTIVITY: Story/Fairies and Elves, Phase 2: group movement, listening for cues
All students were to move around the room and jump over the scarf “holes” when they heard the musical cue. T, at piano, played predictable pattern and students successfully leapt at the appropriate time. T then added some variations, such as asking students to jump only when eighth notes were played.
Response: Most students were successful. All were very engaged.
Purpose: listening, anIcipaIng paQern/phrase length, recognizing duraIon (as when listening for eighth notes), navigaIng space/energy

TRANSITION: In the spirt of the story, “fairies and elves” were asked to find a scarf to fluQer as they fell asleep to the song
T: played “Ah, Poor Bird” on piano.
Response: Students quickly recognized the tune and naturally began to quietly sing.

Purpose: (re)introduce the song, give students a chance to relax/shiV gears

ACTIVITY: Fairies/Elves, Phase 3: Which notes are longer?
T played “Ah, Poor Bird” on piano and asked students to hold scarves, travel around the room, and toss/catch their scarves on the longer notes. Students were then asked to jog the underlying eighth notes/walk the quarter notes/walk the half notes, while still tossing their scarves on the long notes.
Response: Students were successful in recognizing/showing the longer notes, but not always able to step the duraIons.
Purpose: recognizing duraIon, awareness of phrase length and form, experiencing mood of song
Note: It seemed that children were not dis3nguishing the difference between measure 3 and the other measures (not realizing it did not end in a half note). I was curious about this, but am not certain I am remembering the rhythm correctly. Perhaps, there was just no need to make it an issue.

TRANSITION: Fairies/Elves arrive home. All rest on ground. Purpose: relax and refocus

ACTIVITY: Game, 1-3-5 recogniIon
As an introducIon to the acIvity, T placed three papers on the floor (each in a different area of the room), while singing a neutral syllable paQern on scale degree 1, then on 5. Students were then asked to listen to piano and move to appropriate area of the room, based on what they heard. Pitches were further solidified by holding scarves low/high accordingly.
Response: Students were engaged and, for the most part, accurate. A bit of aQenIon was paid to 1 and 5 first, before adding 3 (which was maybe removed??). T was able to add 1 an octave above, and draw aQenIon to the “high” and “low” 1.
Purpose: recognize scale degree, physicalize the difference between the pitches (high/low/ middle).

ACTIVITY: Sing What I Show
T indicated scale degree by holding up finger(s) and asked students to sing appropriate number. T then sang a simple song (unknown to me, but familiar to the class), on numbers, while sIll indicaIng scale degree with fingers.
A few students then had a chance to lead the group (holding up fingers) in a short improvised pattern
Response: Students were asked to use scale degrees 1 and 5. Right away, the second student added 3 as well. Overall, the students seemed very comfortable and demonstrated a solid sense of the scale degrees.
Purpose: scale degree, improvisaIon, leading/ownership

ACTIVITY: Drawing and Playing Shapes
To demonstrate, T drew a shape made up of 4 (I believe) lines, then arranged 4 tone bars in that same shape and played the tone bars according to the drawing. Students then each drew their own shape and shared it with the group. T arranged and played tone bars according to each student’s drawing/direcIons. Students then sang back each paQern, as T indicated with hand movements the pitch direcIon.
Response: Students were very interested, took great care in drawing and explaining their shapes, and sang each other’s patterns successfully.
Purpose: space exploration, improvisation, leading/ownership, pitch

7-9 Dalcroze: 1/24/17

Here are this week’s activities:

  • Make a straight line with one hand and a circle with the other.
    • Not easy for anyone to do, and most were not able to accomplish this. However, it allowed us to become acclimated to our temporary room which contained a large wall mirrored wall. I allowed them to look at themselves for a while, and then announced, “There actually is no mirror here,” hoping to discourage them from being distracted by it. It mostly worked!
  • Association: quarter note=walk; eight notes=stop and clap
    • I played very simply on a drum, and asked a student to play. This is the first time students have played for a movement exercise. I was surprised at how carefully they played and listened to each other, though it was challenging to sustain interest by the time we got to the last student. I participated with the movers.
  • Same game, but I played on the piano, using the low register for the feet, and the upper register for the hands.
    • I stuck to the rhythmic structure I had set up, but gradually moved it into a dissociation: the feet stepped quarter notes and the hands clapped eighth notes. Many were successful. For some this is challenging.
  • Ah Poor Bird
    • I transitioned into this simple but beautiful little round which some already knew. I put them into ‘nests’ and asked one to ‘fly’ into another’s nest and land right at the end of the song.
  • Ice Skating
    • By special request, we repeated this from last week. This time, I played for it and asked them to develop a trick or series of movements that they could demonstrate. Each took a turn. They moved with abandon!
  • 1-3-5
    • As they relaxed on the floor, I began to lead them in associations with 1, 3 and 5 of the scale (showing what they hear with arms, legs, fingers as they liked). I slowly introduced the Haydn to see who might recognize it. Some did. We then used tone bars to invent phrases using 1-5 of the scale. We then played and sang phrases using tone bars of 1-5 of the C major scale. Some sang with numbers, with varying degrees of accuracy. I chose not to correct, but to just let them experiment without feeling like they had to ‘get it right’. There will be plenty of time for that!

7-9 year olds: 1/17/17

  • Spinning
    • Kids of a certain age often like to spin when they come into a classroom. I’ll leave it to the psychologists to explain why, but sometimes I’ll start where they are. So today I began to play music that matched their spinning. I gradually changed the music and pointed out that it no longer sounded like spinning. I asked them what it sounded like, and soon all were doing the movement. We added several more movements and each time I returned to the spinning.
  • Clap 4: at the signal, stop and clap 4 times.
    • This game was a repeat, but this time I added an element. At the first signal, they stop and clap. At the next they touched their knees four times. We kept cycling between the two until most of them could remember, and then we continued adding. They suggested the movements. I aimed for music that met their predictions most of the time. We tried a variety of tempos and dynamics.
  • Story: The Duration Family
    • They managed to squeeze another story out of me! Mother (quarter note), brother (eighth notes), the dog (sixteenth notes) and grandma and grandpa (half notes) like to play a game on Saturday nights. They sit in a row (labeled with the appropriate symbol. They turn on the radio, and wait for their music to come on, at which point one of them gets up and moves around the others. At the end, they all go out for a walk. Each member pairs up with someone from another group. They hold hands and move their own movements simultaneously. The set up and rules were a bit cumbersome here, and I might not do this again. I did enjoy watching them move together with another’s movement. This is something that even some adults might find tricky the first time, and many of them managed to do it with accuracy. Many of the kids assumed their roles thoroughly, especially grandma and grandpa.
  • Ice skating to Vivaldi
    • After the focused concentration of the previous game, we cut loose with some free movement to a recording from the Winter movement of Vivaldi’s 4 Seasons. The music changes from pointed staccato to very free and sweeping phrases: perfect for walking with ice skates and then skating.
  • Cool Down: snow angles
    • Everyone created or led a tempo. Most of the class joined in. Some took the opportunity to rest. They are feeling more free to make individual choices.
  • 1-3-5
    • With not much time left, we ended by singing (call and response style) phrases using 1, 3 and 5 of the scale. I also associated hand signals and took a few moments to remind them of the Haydn Surprise Symphony melody.

That’s it for this week!